​​​Q. How do I contact Florence Rural Fire District?
A. Florence Fire Stations are not manned unless there is an emergency call. Call 911 with any emergency. Routine matters can be left on the district answering machine. 

Q. How does the Florence Fire District get money to operate?

A. There is a property tax levy within the district that provides basic operating funds. Donations and earnings from supporting other departments and State and Federal agencies also support the district.

Q. What does a Fire Engine cost?
A. That depends on the type of fire engine.  Florence Fire has two Type 1 Structural Engines, two Type 3 Wildland Engines, and Two Type 6 Wildland Engines. Additionally there are 2 Water Tenders and a Crew Cab Pickup that carries Fire/Rescue/EMS and command gear, an ambulance and a quick response unit.  The current fleet varies from 5 to 25 years old. Some were bought used, some of our fire equipment has been moved from truck chassis to truck chassis four or five times. New fire equipment is prohibitively expensive, a small truck costing $100,000 and up to a half million dollars for structural engines. The Florence Fire District shops for new, used, and surplus equipment to get the best value out of the tax dollars being spent.

Q. Why do Florence Fire Engines go out on fires in other districts?
A. Our engines are sent out on "Mutual Aid" to other fire departments who have an incident and have requested additional help.  Our engines are also sent out to support the State and Federal agencies responsible for wildland fire protection on large scale fires.

Q. What do Florence Fire District Firefighters get paid?
A. Florence Firefighters, including the Chief and other officers, are all  unpaid volunteers. The District Board employs a part-time paid secretary.

Q. Will I get charged for calling the Fire Department?
A. There is no charge for calling 911, and there is no charge from the fire district.

Q. Should motorists stop when they see or hear an emergency vehicle approaching with emergency lights and siren operating?
A. Yes. Montana law states the following: "Upon the immediate approach of an authorized emergency vehicle making use of audible and visual signals meeting the requirements of 61-9-402 or of a police vehicle properly and lawfully making use of an audible signal only, the operator of every other vehicle shall yield the right-of-way and shall immediately drive to a position parallel to, and as close as possible to, the right-hand edge or curb of the roadway clear of any intersection and shall stop and remain in that position until the authorized emergency vehicle or police vehicle has passed"

Q. When drivers approach an emergency vehicle scene, what precautions should they take?
A. Do not make the emergency scene worse. Drivers should maintain a safe driving speed, keep their eyes on the road and follow directions from authorized personnel. Be aware that other emergency vehicles may be approaching the scene.






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